Marble Bathroom Countertops

Marble Bathroom Countertops

Marble Countertop Bathroom When you ask a countertop contractor about the wisdom of installing marble countertops, the typical answer is, “it depends on where you’re going to use them.” The general consensus is that marble makes a good surface for bathrooms, offices, fireplace surrounds and other locations where they don’t get heavy use. However, they are not recommended for the kitchen. Let’s take a look at the strengths and weaknesses of marble countertops and see if the opening premise holds up. Marble Countertops offer Spectacular Beauty The reason marble remains in heavy demand for countertops is its elegant good looks. This igneous stone comes in a wonderful display of color. Your choice of hues includes solid white, solid black and a range of variety colors in the rose, yellow, gray, green, white and black spectrums. No two slabs are alike, so you’ll be assured of having a unique countertop for your home. Marble Counters can Take the Heat Marble is heat resistant. In the kitchen, it stands up well to hot pans and pots. In the bathroom, a styling tool won’t mar it unless left on it hot for some time. It’s become popular for fireplace surrounds because it won’t yellow due to the heat and can withstand the occasional spark on its surface. Concerns about Marble There are two primary reasons that marble countertop installation is not recommended for the kitchen. These concerns are severe enough that some marble countertop manufacturers won’t warranty their counters if they are installed in the kitchen. The first concern is the porous nature of marble. It’s more porous than granite, so it more readily absorbs liquids. That means that oil, wine, juice and other spills penetrate deeper into the stone very quickly, and they are hard, if not impossible, to get out. Even in the bathroom, be cautious with things like nail polish, liquid makeup or remover that can stain the tops.  Marble’s natural beauty often leaves people undeterred by this eventuality, but fortunately there are sealers which are commercially available for the do-it-yourselfer, as well as professionals who can help. Marble can and should be sealed when installed and again every few years. However, if it is not done properly or often enough, staining is a “not if, but when” proposition.  While no products available on the market today offer a panacea, if you do accidentally stain or scratch your marble countertops, you do have some options. The second reason to be concerned about marble kitchen counters is that the material isn’t sturdy enough for the kitchen. Sharp knives can scratch the surface. Heavy pots or mugs may chip the marble or even break off a corner. These are the primary reasons some manufacturers won’t warranty marble countertops if used in kitchens and many countertop installers won’t install them. There are too many complaints from homeowners when their marble kitchen countertops stain, scratch, chip or crack. Conclusion If you love the look of marble – and it is beautiful – consider installing marble counters in locations other than the kitchen. They offer beauty and good longevity when they are treated with the care they require. Related posts: Pros and Cons of Granite Kitchen Countertops Pros and Cons of Concrete Countertops Pros and Cons of Wood Countertops Pros and Cons of Crushed Glass Countertops Pros and Cons of Slate Countertops Pros and Cons of Granite Bathroom Countertops
marble bathroom countertops 1

Marble Bathroom Countertops

Marble Countertop Bathroom When you ask a countertop contractor about the wisdom of installing marble countertops, the typical answer is, “it depends on where you’re going to use them.” The general consensus is that marble makes a good surface for bathrooms, offices, fireplace surrounds and other locations where they don’t get heavy use. However, they are not recommended for the kitchen. Let’s take a look at the strengths and weaknesses of marble countertops and see if the opening premise holds up. Marble Countertops offer Spectacular Beauty The reason marble remains in heavy demand for countertops is its elegant good looks. This igneous stone comes in a wonderful display of color. Your choice of hues includes solid white, solid black and a range of variety colors in the rose, yellow, gray, green, white and black spectrums. No two slabs are alike, so you’ll be assured of having a unique countertop for your home. Marble Counters can Take the Heat Marble is heat resistant. In the kitchen, it stands up well to hot pans and pots. In the bathroom, a styling tool won’t mar it unless left on it hot for some time. It’s become popular for fireplace surrounds because it won’t yellow due to the heat and can withstand the occasional spark on its surface. Concerns about Marble There are two primary reasons that marble countertop installation is not recommended for the kitchen. These concerns are severe enough that some marble countertop manufacturers won’t warranty their counters if they are installed in the kitchen. The first concern is the porous nature of marble. It’s more porous than granite, so it more readily absorbs liquids. That means that oil, wine, juice and other spills penetrate deeper into the stone very quickly, and they are hard, if not impossible, to get out. Even in the bathroom, be cautious with things like nail polish, liquid makeup or remover that can stain the tops.  Marble’s natural beauty often leaves people undeterred by this eventuality, but fortunately there are sealers which are commercially available for the do-it-yourselfer, as well as professionals who can help. Marble can and should be sealed when installed and again every few years. However, if it is not done properly or often enough, staining is a “not if, but when” proposition.  While no products available on the market today offer a panacea, if you do accidentally stain or scratch your marble countertops, you do have some options. The second reason to be concerned about marble kitchen counters is that the material isn’t sturdy enough for the kitchen. Sharp knives can scratch the surface. Heavy pots or mugs may chip the marble or even break off a corner. These are the primary reasons some manufacturers won’t warranty marble countertops if used in kitchens and many countertop installers won’t install them. There are too many complaints from homeowners when their marble kitchen countertops stain, scratch, chip or crack. Conclusion If you love the look of marble – and it is beautiful – consider installing marble counters in locations other than the kitchen. They offer beauty and good longevity when they are treated with the care they require.
marble bathroom countertops 2

Marble Bathroom Countertops

My marble has small pits as well. My guess is that these are unavoidable; little fissures in the stone are no doubt a natural occurrence, so when the stone is cut and honed or polished, they appear. I just ignore them. I’ve read that pulling pots off the stove and setting them on the marble can cause cracks. Don’t know if this is true, but better safe than sorry. I either use hot pads or set the pot on somewhere other than the marble. I pour boiling water into a teapot or tea cup directly on the marble without worrying, and nothing has happened. I would not bang a jar directly on the marble. I put a cutting board on the marble and bang on that. When something strikes the marble fairly hard (such as a jar of vitamins tumbling off a shelf and landing on the marble), a small white spot appears at the point of impact. I understand that this is actually a change in the molecular structure of the marble. The etching, stains, and spots of all kinds don’t trouble me, but I do not like those white spots. I’m careful not to bang anything on the counter and changed where I keep the vitamin jars because they so frequently tumbled down. With these modifications, white spots are becoming a rare event.
marble bathroom countertops 3

Marble Bathroom Countertops

Timeless Elegance Marble countertop is a favorite for high-end baths. This White Venatino marble, with shades of white-gray and swirling black, is a classic choice. Photo courtesy of Walker Zanger Classic Flair This Carrara polished marble imparts a fresh, clean appearance. Marble tends to be more practical in kitchens than in baths, due to fewer spills and lighter use. Photo courtesy of AKDO Small Space, Big Style A vanity topped in Light Turkish polished marble makes a big splash in a small bath. The timeless surface lasts for years. Photo courtesy of AKDO Engineered Marble Engineered marble countertop is an alternative to natural stone. Made from 93 percent marble and seven percent resin and pigments, it requires less maintenance and offers greater durability. Photo courtesy of Cosentino Marlique Marble
marble bathroom countertops 4

Marble Bathroom Countertops

I just wanted to say that I am with you on the marble thing. I have marble in my master bath (emperador light), marble in my laundry room (Cararra), as well as Marble in my kitchen, mudroom, and pantry (Calacatta Bella). Lots of marble, right? Well, I am a marble lover too, however, I realize that love is not enough. I believe you need to understand first and foremost that marble is NOT granite or manufactured quartz. It is softer and far more porous and like you said, it really only stays factory “perfect” for mere minutes. I absolutely love my marble and I don’t mind caring for something that I believe adds such unparalleled beauty to my home.

Marble Bathroom Countertops

Marble Bathroom Countertops
Marble Bathroom Countertops

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