Burger King Kitchen Equipment

Burger King Kitchen Equipment

Returning to the practice of targeting the adult demographic as it had in 1978, BK introduced several new products to its menu in 2003. The new products included new or revamped chicken sandwiches, a new salad line, and its BK Joe brand of coffee. The first of these items was the TenderCrisp chicken sandwich, an entirely new sandwich which featured a fried 5.2 oz (150 g) whole-muscle chicken breast on a corn-dusted roll. The sandwich was part of then-CEO Greg Brenneman’s plans to bolster the company’s revived “Have it your way” advertising program, which was designed to draw younger people to its stores. Some items, including the Enormous Omelet Sandwich line and the BK Stacker line, brought negative attention due the large portion size, amounts of unhealthy fats, and the presence of trans-fats. At the time, many of the products featured higher-quality ingredients like whole chicken breast, Angus beef, Cheddar cheese, and pepper jack cheese. Not all the products new products introduced under Blum’s tenure met corporate sales expectations, the Baguette Chicken sandwiches being an example. Others products, such as Burger King’s line of “indulgent” burgers originally called the Angus Burger, have undergone multiple reformulations. The Angus Steak burger was originally based around a 5 oz (140 g) frozen patty; despite high expectations from the company, the sandwich fared poorly. After a reformulating program, it was relaunched in 2008 as the 5 oz (140 g) Angus Steakhouse burger. With the introduction of a new multifunction broiler capable of cooking a more diverse set of products, Burger King replaced the Angus Steakhouse burger with the 7 oz (200 g) Steakhouse XT burger in 2009. In 2011, the company discontinued selling the product in the North American market, replacing it with the Chef’s Choice Burger. The Chef’s Choice Burger was removed in 2012. 2014 saw the introduction of the newest attempt at introducing a premium burger to the company’s portfolio with the introduction of the A.1. Ultimate Cheeseburger in North America.
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Burger King Kitchen Equipment

When the predecessor to the modern Burger King, Insta-Burger King, opened in 1953 in Jacksonville, Florida, the company’s menu consisted predominantly of hamburgers, French fries, soft drinks, and desserts. Insta-Burger King was acquired in 1954 by two of its franchisees, James McLamore and David Edgerton, who renamed it Burger King. Under its new ownership, the company continued to develop its core menu, cooking techniques, and equipment. In 1957 McLamore and Edgerton created BK’s signature item, the Whopper, as a way to differentiate BK from other burger outlets at the time. The Whopper is a 4 oz (110 g) hamburger with lettuce, tomato, mayonnaise, pickle, and ketchup, that was priced at 29¢. The sandwich was designed to give the customer a larger product with better value than competitors, who were selling burgers with an average price of 15¢. As Burger King’s flagship product, the Whopper has been expanded beyond the original sandwich into a line of sandwiches all made with the same ingredients. The Whopper sandwich has undergone several modifications in its recipe over the years, with a change from a plain bun to a sesame seed roll in the early 1970s and a change in patty size in the mid-1980s being two of the most notable. Since its inception, the Whopper has become synonymous with Burger King and become the focus of much of its advertising. The company has even named its kiosk-style restaurants “Whopper Bars”.
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Burger King Kitchen Equipment

The predecessor to Burger King, Insta-Burger King, began deploying the original broiling device in 1952 when its owners, Matthew Burns and Kieth Kramer, acquired the rights to George Read’s Inst-Shake and Insta-Broiler machines. The Insta-Broiler cooked the burgers in a wire basket between two broilers, allowing the burgers to be cooked on both sides simultaneously. The machine was capable of cooking over 400 patties per hour, which allowed the company to grow rapidly. When McLamore and Edgarton opened their first Insta-Burger King location in Miami, they revamped the unit into what they called a “flame broiler” – the forerunner of the modern unit used by Burger King today. After the acquisition of Insta-Burger King in 1954, the pair contracted the construction of the newly designed flame broilers to the SaniServ company of Indianapolis, Indiana, for the initial run of broilers. Eventually, the company moved the manufacturing contract for the broiler units to Nieco Automatic Broilers of Windsor, California, who manufactured all subsequent units until the start of the 2000s.
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Burger King Kitchen Equipment

Edwards Baking provides Burger King with prepackaged pies and pie-style desserts while providing oversight and assistance with the chain’s dessert products. BK is one of Edwards’ major national contracts, where the company provides Burger King with assistance in marketing programs, point-of-purchase advertising materials, market research, and other resources. Edwards has a full-time staff assigned to Burger King’s headquarters in Miami. Before Edwards became Burger King’s primary baked goods supplier, the chain had a contract with Awrey Bakeries of Livonia, Michigan, for its line of pre-packaged breakfast products. Burger King sold a line of Awrey products including danish, doughnuts, and birthday cakes.
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Burger King Kitchen Equipment

The company has adapted its menu to accommodate different dietary lifestyles by adding several vegetarian options, including salads, the BK Veggie sandwich, and its deep-fried spicy bean burger that is sold in Burger King’s international locations. The majority of these products do not qualify as vegan due to the presence of egg or dairy products; an example is the BK Veggie, which is approved by the British Vegetarian Society. Society guidelines do not require their approved products to be vegan, and allow ovo-lacto-vegetarian ingredients. The Veggie Burger is widely sold in other countries, sometimes under different names (for example, it is called a “Country Burger” in Germany). Burger King added low-carb variants of several of its products in 2004 that are in accordance with low-carb diets such as the Atkins diet and the South Beach Diet. Low-carbohydrate preparation consists of eliminating the bread and serving the product in a bowl with silverware.
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Burger King Kitchen Equipment

During the late 1960s, Tyson Foods was devising new methods to broaden their market, including introducing smaller consumer packaging and landing military contracts. The company expanded its commercial division by offering new products to McDonald’s and Burger King. Tyson’s McDonald’s product eventually evolved into Chicken McNuggets while Burger King’s product became the basis of its chicken sandwiches. For their 2010 rib promotion, Tyson was Burger King’s pork supplier. Despite a production-significant lead time, the estimated four-month product supply lasted Burger king less than three months.
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Burger King Kitchen Equipment

A 1996 E. Coli outbreak at one of Burger King’s largest beef providers, Hudson Foods, gave Tyson Foods one of its largest business coups. Hudson was one of the largest poultry providers in the United States and one of Tyson’s largest competitors when they moved into beef processing at the behest of Burger King. Once it had secured a contract with Burger King, Hudson opened a beef processing plant in Nebraska. When the plant was identified as the source of an E. Coli breakout in 1996, Burger King abandoned the company as a supplier.
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Burger King Kitchen Equipment

For many years Burger King owned and operated its own distribution system, known originally as Distron. Distron, founded shortly after establishment of Burger King, primarily served the company-owned stores and 50–60 percent of franchised stores. Franchise groups were free to purchase supplies from one of seventeen independent distribution systems, often operated by larger franchise groups such as Carrols Restaurant Group. The Distron setup remained relatively stable until BK was purchased from Pillsbury by Grand Metropolitan. Grand Met originally planned to sell it after the purchase, but ended up reorganizing the division into two separate groups for procurement (Burger King Purchasing ) and distribution (Burger King Distribution Services ). The move resulted in the layoff of over a hundred staff members.
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Introduced as a direct challenge of corporate rival McDonald’s, the Big King was Burger King’s response to the Big Mac and had a similar style and taste. The sandwich was originally introduced in 1993 under the name Double Supreme during its testing stage. The name was switched to Big King when it was introduced nationally in 1997, and again to the King Supreme when reintroduced in 2002. The sandwich was discontinued in the North American market in the mid-2000s. In November 2013, Burger King brought the Big King back to the North American market as a permanent menu item. The Big King sandwich’s recipe is exactly the same as the original 1990s recipe, including a three-piece roll. The Big King sandwich is also sold in many of the company’s international markets in several forms.
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To generate additional sales, BK will occasionally introduce limited time offers (LTO) that are versions of its core products or new products intended for either long- or short-term sales. Many of these LTO products focus on core menu products such as the Whopper, which has featured variations such as the Texas Double Whopper with added jalapeños, bacon, and pepperjack cheese. Other LTOs include all-new sandwiches like the Chick’n Crisp sandwich (now a permanent item in many regions) and test products such as the company’s Great American Burger, which was an attempt at a premium sandwich in 2003. It was made with a Whopper patty and several new ingredients, including a bakery-style bun; peppered bacon; whole-leaf, as opposed to shredded, lettuce; seasoned mustard; and a special sauce. The burger was served with American cheese, mayonnaise, tomato, and onions. A similar burger was tested in Wisconsin in 1999. That Great American burger featured a single 8 oz (230 g) burger patty and different toppings. It was designed to be cooked on a forerunner of the current batch broiler.

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